Thrift shop gives big to children’s agency

May 11, 2007
By

LOU MANCINELLI

Hospital mergers and a lack of volunteers over the years cut the number of organizations that benefit from the Thrift Shop of Boston, located in Roslindale, from 11 to one. But in 2006, the store raised $40,000 to benefit Jamaica Plain’s Home for Little Wanderers, said Anne Robertson, a worker at the shop.

“The Thrift Shop of Boston keeps getting better and better,” said Lisa Rowan-Gillis, vice president of development and public relations for the Home in a press release. “The latest donation was the largest amount the Thrift Shop has ever given and is a testament to the hard work and dedication of its many volunteers. As always, the funds will support our many programs, which provide vital services to children and families in need.”

The Thrift Shop, located at 17 Corinth St., is a non-profit organization run by volunteers, and two full-time staff members. It was created in 1926 and through the efforts of Margaret Howland, it used to run its small thrift store from the headquarters of the Home for Little Wanderers.

“This is all volunteers, all helping children in need,” said Angela Mycock, spokesperson for the Home. “What more could you ask for?”

Other agencies that have collaborated with the Thrift Shop over the years include Children’s Hospital Boston and University Hospital.

Robertson said the Thrift Shop has operated its business from Roslindale for the past six years.

“People are becoming aware that we’re here and we have bargain prices for good items,” said Robertson. “We have good management and volunteer cores. With the enthusiasm of both, we are beginning to get more goods.”

“If you get the goods on the floor quicker, people will find them and they are happy,” she said.

To donate goods, walk in to the store any time during business hours and someone at the front desk will assist you. For large items and furniture, the Thrift Store of Boston arranges a time for them to come to you and pick up the items. The store pays for the cost.

“We’re as excited as the home is that we can give this amount to
children in great need,” said Robertson. “Kids get top help from a terrific place.”

According to a press release, The Home for Little Wanderers is the nation’s oldest, not for profit child and family service agency. It provides services to thousands of children and their families through 20 programs each year. The mission of the Home is to ensure the healthy emotional, mental, and social development of children at risk, their families, and communities through an integrated system of prevention, advocacy, research and a continuum of direct services. For more information, visit www.thehome.org.