Alleged gang members charged in gun case

April 1, 2011
By

David Taber

Three men alleged to be associated with the Mozart Street gang were indicted March 17 on charges they were felons in possession of firearms during a Dec. 22 trip to a shooting range in Salisbury.

One of them, Christian Green, is a Jamaica Plain resident, according to court documents.

The three defendants—Green, Sherwin Garcia of Roxbury and Jeffrey Medina or Quincy—have prior felony convictions so their participation in target practice with live ammunition is considered a federal felony offense.

“The very idea of violent gang members practicing at a shooting range should be chilling to anyone concerned about urban violence,” said Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel Conley in a press release.

Attorney Michael Andrews, who is representing Green, told the Gazette that Green’s prior felony conviction stems from a single charge of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute. He declined to comment further on the case.

Garcia and Medina—who were on probation following previous state convictions on firearms charges—have not yet appeared in federal court and have not been assigned lawyers for the case.

According to an affidavit filed in the case by a local police officer, Green was involved in a high-speed car and foot chase with police in November after a car he was traveling in failed to stop. Police retrieved a gun along the route the car had traveled, Blas said.

According to court documents, an investigation began against Green, Medina and Garcia after a Dec. 22 incident where they were stopped by Salisbury police and told the officers they were on their way to a shooting range in that town.

Surveillance videos and signed documents indicate that the three—along with a fourth person who does not have any felony convictions—spent an hour shooting guns at Bob’s Indoor Tactical Shooting Range in Salisbury, according to the indictment.

Green, Medina and Garcia are all currently in custody. They face up to 10 years in jail, three years probation and a $250,000 fine if convicted.

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