Political Notes

July 6, 2012
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Councilor wants school recycling bins

Next time a student uses an empty water bottle as a basketball, City Councilor At-Large Felix Arroyo wants the target to be a recycling bin.

Arroyo, a Jamaica Plain resident, has introduced a hearing order to bring single-stream recycling to the Boston Public Schools system, according to a press release.

“The lessons young people learn do not just happen in the classroom,” said Arroyo, according to the press release. “By having recycling bins in our schools, students learn the importance of recycling and putting water bottles in the blue bin instead of the trash can.”

Arroyo got the idea from Nadia Issa, who visited with the councilor during a civics day with Generation Citizen, a nonprofit that works to empower young people to solve problems in their own communities.

Local rep supports personal care bill

The state House of Representatives recently approved legislation that would require personal care attendants to attend an orientation program, according to a press release.

Local state Rep. Jeffrey Sánchez voted in favor of the bill (H. 4081).

“This bill ensures personal care attendants know their rights and responsibilities,” said Sánchez, according to the press release. “Importantly, it will also continue to allow consumers to train their personal care attendant around their individual needs.”

The legislation requires the Personal Care Attendant Workforce Council to create the orientation program, and the training must be completed within fours months of starting employment.

The bill now moves on to the state Senate, according to the press release.

Sánchez acts on gas-leak concerns

The state House of Representatives passed legislation that establishes a uniform natural gas leak classification for all gas companies, according to a press release. The classification sets up the assessment and appropriate safety response for natural gas leaks in the state.

Local state Rep. Jeffrey Sánchez voted to approve the bill (H. 4199).

“This is a concern that my constituents have been vocal about,” said Sánchez, according to the press release. “I am pleased to be able to deliver what they have asked for and am glad that my colleagues and I were able to provide a standard for these safety concerns.”

The Gazette reported earlier this year that some JP residents were concerned that natural gas leaks killed trees along the Arborway.

The bill requires gas companies to file a report annually to the state Department of Public Utilities detailing the location of gas leaks that have been classified as hazardous and non-hazardous and the dates of repair, according to the press release.

The bill also dictates that the state Department of Public Utilities create a replacement program that addresses the aging natural gas infrastructure. The natural gas companies will work with the department in the execution of the program.